Christopher Sun

Biomedical Systems Engineering, 1T3+PEY

Christopher Sun

Christopher Sun is currently doing his PhD in Industrial Engineering at U of T, with Professor Timothy Chan, focusing on healthcare system optimization. He was awarded a Barbara and Frank Milligan Graduate Fellowship and an Ontario Graduate Scholarship for his graduate studies towards healthcare and biomedical engineering. Christopher recently presented his work on the optimization of public access defibrillator deployments at the 2015 CORS/INFORMS joint International Conference. As the Vice-President of the University of Toronto Operations Research Group (UTORG), Christopher has been promoting the research culture and environment in the field through numerous events such as hosting research talks and socials. Christopher also had the privilege of being an invited panelist at The Operations Research Challenge (TORCH) – U of T’s annual operations research competition, to talk about his experiences and inspire high school students to pursue engineering.

Christopher advocates for the Engineering Science program and the growth of students after graduation. He offers the following insight and advice:

“In terms of personal development and growth, I think one of the greatest aspects of Engineering Science is that it builds your character and work ethic. There are many times throughout undergrad where you are faced with a decision to cut your losses and move on to the next assignment knowing you could have done more, or to dig deep and put in the extra effort to get that last ten percent to finalize and polish your work. At first, it is very difficult decision to make, but when you are surrounded by a group of talented individuals in an environment that expects excellence, a mentality to complete your work to the best of your ability is engrained in your subconscious. And after the first few times you choose to go the extra distance you realize that no matter how far you think you can go, you can go farther. And now you can graduate from the program understanding what kind of quality of work you want to produce and how to produce it. I think this is only possible because of the well planned and designed structure of the program, allowing students to interact with experts in each of the engineering departments of U of T as well as providing the resources to learn and excel. The program itself is structured such that we get a chance to try a bit of everything, so we are prepared for anything. My advice for EngSci students is to build relationships and really enjoy your time in the program because it’s very rare to be surrounded by hundreds of extremely bright, enthusiastic and sincere people in an environment that is so encouraging of learning and development.”