EngSci students take flight in microgravity to unravel physics mystery

Update Aug 1, 2017:  Check out the team’s Twitter feed feed for photos and videos from their flight.

Originally posted July 24, 2017

Not many of us get to experience what it’s like to float in space.  This week several of our students will get to experience the next best thing — a flight on a microgravity aircraft where they will try to unravel a complex physics process.

Collectively known as Team AVAIL (Analyzing Viscosity and Inertia in Liquids), Neell Young (EngSci 1T4 + PEY, MASc Student UTIAS), Caulan Rupke, Michael Lawee and Andrew Ilersich (all Year 4 EngSci) will conduct experiments on a phenomenon known as the “liquid rope coil” effect.

See a video of the effect and learn more about the team’s mission.

Team AVAIL — left to right, Caulan Rupke (Year 4 EngSci), Neell Young (EngSci 1T4 + PEY, UTIAS MASc candidate), Andrew Ilersich and Michael Lawee (both Year 4 EngSci) — has designed a physics experiment that will be carried out in simulated microgravity. Their results could accelerate the use of 3D printers to address key challenges for long-term space missions. (Photo credit: Team AVAIL)

Their work will have implications for 3D printing in microgravity during long-term space missions.  Here on Earth, it could also help develop 3D printing techniques for new porous materials for use in biomedical engineering.

The team is in Ottawa July 24 – 28 for a flight on the National Research Council’s Falcon 20 aircraft.  Read about their mission and follow their progress on Twitter and Youtube.